Rebuilding Rollers/Idlers (click on first photo - use arrows)

Seal Removal 1
Using a small chisel, punch a hole in the seal. Position the chisel vertically at the outer edge of the seal to begin with to release the seal away from the recessed wall a little. This will help the entire seal to come out in one piece - which doesn't always happen.
Note: wear eye protection.
Seal Removal 2
Insert a strong screwdriver or similar tool well into the chiselled hole but not too far as to hinder leverage.
Seal Removal 3
Using a pivot of some kind (another screwdriver in this case) lever the seal up with the strong screwdriver.
See my 'Roller Disassembly' video on the Facebook site's 'Videos' section.
Seal Removal 4
Using a pivot of some kind (another screwdriver in this case) lever the seal up with the strong screwdriver.
See my 'Roller Disassembly' video on the Facebook site's 'Videos' section.
Seal Removal 5
Often, the top half of the seal separates from the bottom half, in which case repeat the process. The lower half is a bit more difficult to lever up.
Clip Removal 1
With the seal removed, the shaft retaining clips (snap rings) can be seen. They are recessed into a groove, which is expanded somewhat in the area of the clip ends to help with leverage. However, the the clips are not always aligned correctly to this recessed area making their removal tricky and frustrating sometimes — the clip keeps snapping back!
Note: rollers that have had grease [bad] instead of oil [good] pumped into them, can be dried-up and gummed-up enough to hold the clips quite firmly,
Clip Removal 2
Basically, you need to lever the snap ring outwards from the groove — enough to get another screwdriver or fine point in behind it. This will allow you to hold it out of the groove with one hand, while you get under the clip's end enough to gradually lever the whole clip out. Using both tools, progressively 'shimmy' around the circumference to finally 'pop' the clip out.
Note: wear eye protection — on occasion they fly out at speed! I cover the shaft with my gloved hand to avoid being hit.
Bushing Shaft Removal 1
With the seals and clips removed, next you need to remove the roller shaft, bronze bushings and steel bushing holders.
Bushing Shaft Removal 2
Using any tool of a similar diameter to the roller's shaft, proceed to punch out the shaft with a club (lump) hammer or a small sledge. Here, I'm using a 1/2 inch socket drive extension as my punch.
Note: if you plan on re-using the shafts OR if the shaft is really tough to punch out, it would be better to use a brass hammer atop the shaft and pound on that as a go-between to prevent the shaft-end from becoming 'mushroomed'.
Bushing Shaft Removal 3
Roller shaft removed, together with one bushing and holder.
Note: using grease has clogged-up the holder's oil holes that send lube to the bushings. ALWAYS use oil (or JD Cornhead Grease)!
Note 2: the process being described is exactly the same for removing front Idler axle shafts and bushings.
Bushing Shaft Removal 4
With the axle shaft removed, there will be one bushing/holder assembly remaining inside the roller.
Bushing Shaft Removal 5
With the axle shaft removed, there will be one bushing/holder assembly still inside the roller. To remove it, this requires punching out from the inside.
Bushing Shaft Removal 6
Removing the last bushing holder. For this task, I use the same 1/2 in. socket drive extension plus a 1/2 to 3/4 inch converter socket. It's a perfect fit!
Again though, you may want to use some cushioning, like a plywood disc, for example, if the bushing holder is really tight. Otherwise cracking it is a real possibility.
Bushing Shaft Removal 7
Here's an unusual but effective outdoors support for this entire process — the tie bar end of an OC-4 track frame.
If you have the luxury, a heavy vice, or a thick wooden block cradle with a 2-1/2 in. hole in the middle would be MUCH preferable.
Oil and Roller Dimensions
Track Rollers & Idlers — Oil every 10 working hours, using the same GL-1-designated, 90w or 80w90 gear oil as in the transmission.
Note: there is always some variation between roller castings so these dimensions are not 'carved in stone'.
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Seal Removal 1

Using a small chisel, punch a hole in the seal. Position the chisel vertically at the outer edge of the seal to begin with to release the seal away from the recessed wall a little. This will help the entire seal to come out in one piece - which doesn't always happen. Note: wear eye protection.